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It's winter, it's Iowa, and there's snow and salt everywhere. So my 88 Spur sits in the garage, gets started and warmed up once a week, and goes nowhere while I get increasingly irritated.

We're far from snowbound, the roads are safely navigable, but here I sit worried about what all that brine is going to do to my car. And it occurs to me, who am I saving it for?

I'm 63, I bought this car to enjoy, and though I may reach 85 I could also go tomorrow, leaving four grown kids to fight over my cars (which I don't expect to take with me).

So why not just hose down the undercarriage with Fluid Film, ignore the salt, and drive my PMC all I want? I'm open to arguments, advice, you name it, I'll listen.

What do you think?
 

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My car is out side all year st it is used daily we use it for holidays and for fun
Had a RR shadow that we used for special occasions every time we went to use it something went on it so this was we have fun and not hasal
 

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It's rather simple. Called Estate Planning. Designate certain assets to heirs and sell others and split the proceeds. By all means have a meeting with the kids.....and a tax attorney.
 

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Harpo, DRIVE IT!! I'm in Virginia and like you, not snow bound but when there is ANY hint of snow, down goes the brine and salt. None the less, I drive her at least two weeks a month. Rain or light snow, I drive it. When I die, the wife will sell it as she could care less about my car. So drive your PMC and enjoy it. I do run it through a carwash that cleans the undercarriage to try and keep it clean. But after all, when we pass on, we won't care about a car.
 

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Hi Harpo
You have a point , we should drive them, but then again I don't want to have the car in the bodyshop having panels cut out and welding painting etc.
So I will drive mine when the salt has gone ,I enjoy driving mine on a nice day, anyway where the fun in getting your car filthy, chipped and rusty?
up to you!
Mike
 

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I do about 3500 miles a year in my Arnage T of which 2000 are done in an annual trip to the fleshpots of Europe. I still find it a problem with the rest of the mileage in finding suitable places to park it when you get there. I also have a 1989 BMW 635CSI but because they are prone to rust I tend to avoid winter roads but have no problem leaving it anywhere. The rest of the time I drive my wife's Mercedes A class.

I have solved the inheritance problem. I have left the cars to my son and my wife has left the jewellery to my daughter.

There's a story in the UK of a man who bought a mint Jaguar e type for £500 from a widow. When he explained to her it was worth a lot more she said she knew that but as the Executor the will said she had to sell the car and give the proceeds to her husbands mistress!
 

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November to March in the garage covered in wool blankets - March to November used every day garaged at night - my estate to be divided between my two sons equally although neither would want the Shadows!
 

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I have one car that I'm concerned about being in too much sun during the summer, and certainly would panic if it even saw a drop of rain! I'm 60 but planning to go at least another 30 years and personally have no qualms about keeping my cars 'parked' and out for nice occasions only. It's fun sitting in a webbed lawn chair during the summer, sipping a bottle of S. Pellegrino and enjoying the view of my vehicles while not worrying about them getting damaged out in the wild. And I would have a fit if they ever saw a hint of even table salt!

Here in Michigan, its also one big salt mine everywhere during the winter. I envision the salt penetrating the Fluid Film on my DD and spreading like a slow rotting cancer. Odd how this being the 21st century, era of the Smartphone, etc. that a non-corrosive method of melting snow has been yet to be developed. I liken it to the NFL which still uses chains and the occasional index card to measure for first downs.
 

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Hey guys I live in Scotland there's that much salt on the road everyone suffers from passive hardening of the arteries har har


I restored my SZ and could see clearly the rot spots, convinced a lot down to undercarriage build quality and inadequate rust prevention, so cut ground and welded new sections in.
You cant beat driving the cars but absence makes the heart grow fonder. I love that first run out in the spring


So winter blanket for my car and roll on the spring


Inheritance no kids either the car auction or a little car museum in Dundee which has a really nice feel to it run by volunteers
 

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That's a clever tool / accessory.nSalt is an issue and not easy to clean because wheels project it in tinny area.
 

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We're far from snowbound, the roads are safely navigable, but here I sit worried about what all that brine is going to do to my car. And it occurs to me, who am I saving it for?
It sounds like a wonderful idea until the blisters start bubbling up through the paint. Then (depending on how OCD you are), you'll start hating yourself. Don't believe any of those English folk who say that they've fixed their rust. They've only fixed what they can see.
 

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Up until the last couple of years, when other life issues have caused some significant interference, I would drive SRH33576 at least once every 2 weeks (and more frequently during the spring through fall). In the winter here in Virginia brine and/or salt gets used, but generally within a week or two of its having been put down we've had a couple of rains after the snows or freezing rains and it's long gone.

That being said, and based on my own reading elsewhere and, now, personal experience, I have stopped ever starting the car during it's winter's nap unless it's to be driven. The issues that crop up with the exhaust system, in particular, from brief runs where the engine warms up but the exhaust system collects condensation, can be easily avoided by just not starting the car. For cars that get genuine use during the non-storage months can manage a couple of months of complete sleep very little (or not at all) the worse for wear.

My problems at the moment, on both cars, are the direct result of extended lack of use, which is something I never thought I'd be dealing with, but life has had other plans.

For the SY era cars the old saw, "the more they're driven the better they get," is absolutely true in my experience. Lack of use is what kills most of these cars. Any mechanical or electromechanical item suffers badly from intermittent use with long, long periods of nothing in between.
 

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It's bad enough when its on the paint, the true horror is the salt water/slush getting into all the nooks and crannies within the undercarriage. And then it stays damp when the thaw hits, then rot begins to form like cancer. Especially on an older car with more steel than aluminum alloy. Combine that with the third world condition of the roads where I live....more than potholes, actual craters....cars crashing by suddenly swerving to avoid the craters or hitting one and crashing from a FWD axle snapping. I'm quite fortunate in that I'm retired and only need to venture out in these months when absolutely necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
With reasonable washing, liberal fluid film, and avoiding freshly applied brine or roads obviously dusty with salt residue, I wonder just exactly how long it would take for rust to appear...

Given my prior experiences with British and Italian cars, I suppose the realistic answer is about 5-10 minutes. :cry:

I guess I'll go with Plan B: Save the Rolls for the summer, and buy something I've always wanted - a ratty but original pre WWII American car with a flathead six and a three speed. I'll fit it with all new brakes and ss lines, and laugh maniacally as I slosh through the slop. :)
 

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I had a new 85 Range Rover in Sweden and Norway for many winters. The brine attacked every bit of plating and any bi metal joint, It corroded inside out and much of the paint fell off. Still alive in Poland I heard though.
Yes I seriously avoid newly gritted (salt) roads in London and wait for spring down pours to flush it away. Yes I'm cautiously OCD!
Rust never sleeps.
 

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Well I've done 200 miles in mine in all weather's now I got the car to drive it it seems such a shame these cars get garaged they are built to be driven I understand about the road salt and stuff but I made sure I coated everything in waxoyl underneath and every orifice I just wash the underside every week just a rinse and wash outside aswell
 

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