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Discussion Starter #1
The more knowledgeable folks on these forums will not be surprised by this, but this is a caution for those of us just getting into the world of Bentley and Rolls Royce.
Lug nuts on the passengers side go on and off “righty tighty, lefty loosey”.
Lug nuts on the driver’s side go on and off the reverse.
I just bought a set of Pirelli Zero Asymmetrical tires and my tech almost snapped off the lug nuts on the driver’s side because I didn’t know the lug nuts were reverse.
So, just a warning for those new owners of these fine vehicles.
 

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Not only that, but look in the Workshop Manual for the correct torque tightening figures for the lug nuts.

I don't know if brass lug nuts were still being used on all of the SZ era cars, but they are on the SY series cars (and earlier series, too, I think) and early SZ, and the torque is only 45-50 ft-lb. That is not nearly as tight as for most marques using steel lug nuts, and you can really screw things up if you "gorillacize" these by overtorquing.

I insist that lug nuts be put back on by hand and using a torque wrench, not an air wrench.
 

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Not only do the tire shops screw up (literally) the thread direction, (stamped on the nut face) but the air tool is set for at least 100ft lbs, 2x what is needed.
I can also bet the lift pads were not placed properly, especially the front ones, not on the rear mounting hardware of the subframe.

It is prudent for the present custodian for these cars to be familiar with them. Entrusting yourself to others in this case, and in the future, may cause damage and be costly.
Post your question on the Forum and get the best advice.
 

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I don't let anyone go near my car, and the one whom I did trust, passed away a while back.
I change out my own tires, I bring the tire shop my rims (or what ever) and I mount them myself when I get home.
The tire shop is a privately owned business where all the locals bring their collector vehicles.
If you request it, he would do it by hand with a torque wrench.

The place has been there a very long time, there is still an oak roll top desk that the guy works from.

176 Government Street, Joe’s Tire Hospital.
 

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@Wraithman is definitely correct.

I have had to teach "my technicians" correct lifting technique, both for using a jack on the floor, and for a lift.

When you're using a floor jack you need to cover the head with a thick rubber pad before placing it under the lift point, which not only helps to prevent any slipping, but also metal to metal contact. By the way, if you're friendly with your local tire shop, ask them if they'll give you their tread samples, which are the perfect size and toughness for this job, or if you can snag an old tire (less convenient and way harder to cut).

For a lift, you need to bring the sill blocks and show exactly where they're placed and how they're used.

The jacking, lifting, and tie down points (and definitely the first two) are the same for the SY and SZ series cars. And if you ever have to have your car towed, get a flatbed, and insist that wheel "tie over tie down" nets are the only thing you allow to be used for tying the car down.

I have found that my local tire shops appreciate having this knowledge prior to even touching the car, and once you know you have "correctly trained techs" you always ask for same. These days you generally can't be physically present in the service bay due to insurance restrictions.

28508


28509


I have found, at least on my SY2 cars, that the cut-out labeled C in the sill block is not necessary.
 

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Hockey pucks make great pads between trolley jacks or lift pads. I cut pads for my lift arms from old tire tread. Just be careful with the raw edge, it will have the exposed tire steel belts, and they can prick you like a thorn.
 

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One of the reasons I love tread samples is their perfect size and no "hazardous edges."

But, no matter what one uses, you've got to use something. Never thought of hockey pucks, as they always struck me as "too hard" and likely to slip. But who can question the voice of experience? Certainly not me.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks to you all. I never expected this level of feedback. I will make sure I get a lift pad made and thanks for the torque specs. I’ll take a more active roll in the maintenance of my Crewe car going forward. Cheers
 
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