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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, my dad has a 1985 bentley mulsanne turbo which has been off the road for a while now as the last time the car was moved it sprung a leak from underneath causing the rear end of the car to drop and the braking system doesn't appear to be working as it should, so as far as i can make out (im only a amature mechanic with a basic knowledge of the way cars work :? ) we have a leak on the hydraulic braking and suspension system so my questions are 1. Is it safe to start the car up in this state to move it out of the garage without risk of damaging anything, such as running a a pump or anything dry? 2. if the leaky hose (which im hoping thats all it is) is located and replaced what is and how easy is the procedure of refilling bleeding the system?
 

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Gary,

The full workshop manual for your car is available in online form at the Rolls-Royce Owners' Club of Australia Technical Library - SZ Series Section. Download all the sections of TSD4400.

You will want to start by reading Chapter G - Hydraulics. This covers bleeding the system and fault diagnosis for same. You could have a bad rear sphere or any number of other leaks back there. I am presuming the leak is from underneath the car and has not originated inside the trunk behind the carpeting at the struts.

Bleeding these cars is far easier than many since the pumps are constantly supplying pressure & mineral oil when the car is running.

If you are able to push the car out of the garage I'd try that first (and I've done this with my Shadow II with only myself and one assistant pushing) rather than starting the engine until you find out where the leak is from and check to see how much mineral oil remains in the reservoirs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Brian,

thankyou very much for your help the literature you linked me to looks very detailed and useful indeed. I have had a look at the car tonight and have almost managed to pin point the leak to one of the small metal pipes to the rear underside of the car that has split in someway. I will look towards removal of of the pipe tomorow evening and then try and source a something to replace it. Unfortunatly the literature you sent me the link to appears to be missing section G3-hydraulic system pipework (the bit i could have done with! :-() so i am somewhat confused as to exactly what the pipe is, is it the same as what is used for brake piping?

thanks once again
Gary
 

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Gary,

All of the hydraulic pipework in these cars (and the braking system is intimately linked [or could be considered part of] with the hydraulic system] is made of mild steel (that is, not stainless). Many people are using cunifer (AKA EZ-Bend) tubing when doing replacements as it's much easier to form and doesn't rust. It is, however, softer and more subject to damage by blows.

You might want to check out the workshop manual for the 20K series cars that came right after yours, as much of the system was the same.

If you actually have a split in one of these pipes that's not the result of corrosion I would be quite shocked (and would really wonder what on earth could have caused that to occur).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
hi again, i have managed to remove the leaky pipe tonight, it was the pipe that fed the the bleed nipple on the rear passenger side (my car being right hand drive), with only a medium amount of difficulty. I think the pipe was original to the car and wasn't to keen to moving after 25 years there :?
I believe the reason for the leak was down to corrosion as it was only a pin prick not a split and the pipe looked and felt corroded, something im relatively used to indentifying being a plumber by trade :)
Thanks for the advice on the material the pipe is made from, i shall ask my local mechanic where is best to source this and hopefully have it back together soon!
thanks
Gaz
 
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