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Discussion Starter #1
SRH33576 has been in storage for several years now and I was remiss in not even following my own advice and doing routine start-ups to keep basic things, like the fuel pump, exercised. The pump is definitely not working, and several have suggested "not so gentle persuasion" of hitting the pump with a hammer when the key is turned to the Run position to see if that will unstick it. The pump was rebuilt by me in 2009, and her hibernation didn't start until 4 or 5 years ago (it's not clear to me at the moment, too much "other water" has been and continues rushing under the bridge of life).

I've tried rapping, but I suspect I'm being too gentle.

So, this leads to several questions:

1. Is there a "preferred hammer size/weight" (I was using a relatively light ball peen).

2. Is there/Are there preferable spots for the hitting?

3. Approximately how hard. I'm not going to throw my whole arm into it, but am trying to decide whether something beyond "very gentle" rapping is required.

Thanks Much,
Brian

P.S. I also posted this question on the RROC Australia Discussion Forums, as I have to get the car out of the garage she's in by tomorrow afternoon. So if you read in both places a response in either one would be fine.
 

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Hi Brian,
Although I have no specific advise on what weight hammer or how hard to wield it, your question reminds me of when, years ago, I worked in furniture and furniture repair, the man I used to work with who had much more experience at the time and was teaching me, always said "if ya can't fix it...get a hammer, if that don't work...get a bigger hammer".
Seriously though, I think some slightly harder than you would think tapping, similar to tapping on a starter with a dead spot might be in order, otherwise remove the pump and service it.

Good Luck
Jon
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Jon,

Ultimately, removing the pump is what will have to happen. All I was hoping for now was getting it revived long enough to back her out of the garage she's in and put her back in my own driveway right next door. I had been kindly loaned garage space by my neighbor, who had not used it in years, several years ago. She now needs it for storage as her brother is moving in (he's in ill health) and there is stuff of his that will go there.

The fact that I had rebuilt this thing in 2009 and it never gave me a moment's problem afterward has made this throw me for a loop. Of course, I know I have only myself to blame for not having assiduously gone over and at the very least started the car every few months at a minimum. But, sometimes in life other things come to the fore and take priority, and in my case that's been happening since 2012.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Turns out that pump rebuild was in 2010. I just checked my archive of photos from repairs and see this was a job from July 2010.

For those interested in what a kit (for one side of the dual pump) contains:

29583


29584
 

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Go soft, 4x4, rubber /plastic mallet. Keep the key on, hit it until it submits.
 

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Hi Brian

Here's a pic of the pump on my series 1 car, to refresh your memory. I believe it's basically the same as yours. The pic shows it with the two end dust covers removed. The points for each pump are located beneath the bakelite covers, marked by the arrows. And that's the rub - hard blows to the ends could well crack the bakelite. I'd give some very light taps either end and slightly heavier taps to the central aluminum housing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Geoff,

Thanks. Although I recall this, once it's under the car and under waterproof tape (which I used) it's harder to recall exactly where.

@Wraithman, although I am going light, "soft" as in rubber mallet is not what most who've "been there, done this, have the t-shirt" are recommending. The sharp blow from a metal hammer, not taken too far, acts somewhat like impact wrenches do. I'll try one more time, with a bit more vigor, tomorrow, but if that doesn't work I have no intention of "putting my arm into it." I will, however, leave the key in the run position if that will not result in "burning out the pump" were it not to submit.
 

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Deadblow or hardwood mallet, ignition on, smack it fairly vigorously in the middle, not on the ends which have the plastic caps. Lead hammer can be used too with less force. Very common problem on SU pumps that have not cycled recently, smacking them is something I have done hundreds of times. There comes a point where hitting it no longer frees the points, but that time depends on the storage circumstances, inside, outside, dry or moist environment etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Jim,

Thanks. Storage has been inside, but in a non-climate-controlled garage that is beneath an apartment. It's dry in there, but does get humid.

I do not have a deadblow mallet handy, but I may have a wooden mallet and I know I have a rawhide mallet I can snag.

Just for a "seconded," can the ignition remain in the Run position throughout the process without risk of damaging the points further?
 

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If it pulls too much current, it will cook the #12 fuse.
 

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A hide mallet is fine too. I've even used rocks on occasion, but you have to be careful where you hit of course. The points in the fuel pump aren't passing current due to the tiniest film of corrosion, hitting the housing with a hammer is jarring them a bit so they do make contact and cause the solenoid to pull in the spring and diaphragm. The points open once the diaphragm is pulled in all the way, the solenoid releases, and the spring pushes the fuel through the outlet valve(s).
 

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Brian.

At no point in this posting have you said if you have tried to actually start the car, regardless of not hearing the pump "tick" when turning on the ignition. If you missed hearing the pump it really could be the carbs are full so no pump "tick" anyway.
Also are you sure there is a 12v supply at the pump with the ignition on?
As you know, these pumps are very simple and because there is two pumps, in effect, you are unlucky if both sides have failed, with sticky points, at the same time.

Jake.
 

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Hi Brian
I can't see a new set of points in the kit?
You need to hit it hard enough so one of the set of contacts make through the oxide layer that has built up from standing. So try and hit in the direction of travel ok
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #16
For clarity, when I rebuilt the pump I did rebuild both sides of the dual pump, but one of them had to be replaced during the rebuild from a donor since the corrosion on that side was so bad that it was damaged beyond repair.

As someone else has already mentioned, the points in that kit were contained in that small plastic bag at the lower right in the photo.

If I knew then what I know now I'd probably tried treating the points with a very thin coating of Sanchem NoOxId electrically conductive grease.

I did, of course, at the beginning of this little adventure try to start the car, repeatedly, even when I hadn't heard the characteristic ticking of the pump. That round was weeks ago, so the float bowls would have definitely been low to empty by yesterday. I was beneath the car, at the pump, with a hammer (not wooden, so I was being very conservative) yesterday and had my partner turn the key to the Run position. I can assure all readers that there is zero ticking.

I am now wishing I had not been so thorough in using Duck waterproof tape at the ends of the pump as it's not so easily removed as the original stuff was, but the original stuff also allowed a massive amount of water and junk in on one end, so I went "more thorough." If I can perhaps get the "easier end" untaped (if the wooden mallet doesn't work) I can at least get a look at what's happening on that end. The space is just too tight to even try that on the other.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Also, I wrote this up after the hell that was getting this pump out of and back in to the car never having done it before. I feel certain I've likely posted this on these forums before, but another time will not hurt:

Getting the SU Fuel Pump In & Out of the Car (for an SY2, pump mounted near rear final drive)
 

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Brian, may I suggest only using the parking brake to stop the car. You may have hydraulic issues and once the pedal is depressed, the calipers get locked up and the cursing begins.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
@Wraithman,

Something I've already considered, but I thank you very much for the tip!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
OK, here are several more questions related to doing a diagnostic:

1. How do I test for +12V getting to the pump? I have the post exposed for one end of the pump, and if memory serves it's grounded through the chassis (though I could be wrong about that). I presumed that connecting one terminal of my test lamp cord to the post on the pump, and another to the chassis somewhere, would eventually result in an illumination when the key is turned to the Run position. Is this correct? [BTW, the lamp has been tested and polarity does not matter as it's not LED]

2. If #1 is correct, and I determine that I am not getting +12V at the pump, is it safe for me to run a switched line from the positive terminal of the battery to the pump post/terminal, then flip the switch to see if I suddenly get pumping action?

My memory is hazy about exactly what the electrical connections involve for the pump and the photos I did take are not helping me much.
 
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