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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Dear all
Having removed the float chambers and dismantled them, a few interesting points;
the RH side bolt that secures the lid of the float chamber has some sort of breather hole - see pic 1812
the LHD lever was partly off when i removed the chamber top so thats probably the real issue?
i have placed both floats in water - they seem to be floating ok- nosound of any liquid inside
needle valves - the lhd side one looks odd to me - three sided?

If the floats seem ok - will leave overnight, i think i will just order a service kit for both float chambers and see how that goes

any advice appreciated
regards patrick
Wood Household hardware Metal Salt and pepper shakers Circle
Wood Household hardware Metal Salt and pepper shakers Circle
Wood Household hardware Metal Salt and pepper shakers Circle
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You will need new lid seals. Trying to overtighten them will cause the lid to warp creating more problems. The float valves are faceted. Reason....less contact area to stick
The tapered ends of the valve must be clean and smooth with no ridgelines on the taper or else it will not hold back fuel like it should.
 

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Hi Patrick

In answer to your previous question, that vent hole in the bolt that secures the lid of the float chamber should be capped. It is used so a gauge can be attached to measure float chamber depression as documented on page K24 of the workshop manual. Without the cap you might, under fault conditions, get a spray of petrol into the engine bay - I would cap it.

The pic below is taken from the catalogue section of the excellent site. You can look up the part numbers there.

 

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Patrick, that is not the way to test for leaks in a "float" all that tells you are the parts that are in the water do not have any cracks or leaky seams.
Water is much thicker than gasoline, you have to use gasoline, water may not get in, but gasoline will.

The entire float have to be forcibly immersed in gasoline, not just to float on top.
Use a large container and immerse them all the way to the bottom.

Another good test is to get a large dipper filled with water, put it on the stove and heat it up.
Immerse the floats in the hot water, letting the floats warm up.
The expansion of the floats will show any weak spots in the floats and bubbles will appear.
 

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That's the recommended test, actual conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Hi Patrick

In answer to your previous question, that vent hole in the bolt that secures the lid of the float chamber should be capped. It is used so a gauge can be attached to measure float chamber depression as documented on page K24 of the workshop manual. Without the cap you might, under fault conditions, get a spray of petrol into the engine bay - I would cap it.

The pic below is taken from the catalogue section of the excellent site. You can look up the part numbers there.

Hi Geoff, many thanks that makes sense. Always a good idea to try and find out why something looks odd
cheers patrick
 
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