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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The lacquer on my rear window trim was smoky-grey, cracking and flaking. Some of it flaked off easily enough; I used an x-acto blade held 90-degrees to the surface to scrape off the rest.

Sanding left the wood lighter than the dash and doorcaps. I stained it with 2 applications of J H Ratcliffe's mahogany oil scumble (paint on, wipe off with cloth).

I had a bit of an issue finding nitrocellulose lacquer in Ireland. I ended up mail-ordering it from www.behlen.co.uk. (Someone somewhere said the factory used polyester lacquer, but I wanted something more tried and true for amateur application.)

Anyway, I've just put down 6 coats, with an hour between each coat. Tomorrow I'll do the first wet-sanding. I found some good videos online (google "wet sanding guitar lacquer"), so I think I'm ready to give it a go.

Jeff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Michael,

Yeah, I need to get some 2000; I think the finest I have is 1500.

I've got some fairly marked unevenness over the grain structure, though, so I started with 400. I think I need at least one more go at 400, and then I'll work my way up through 600, 1000, 1500 and 2000.

I've also got a buffing wheel with white rouge and plastic compound. Will either of those do for the final buff, or do I need to get something like a Meguiar's automotive polish?

Jeff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sweet base! (A touch of Rolls-Royce influence in the colours and cross-banding?)

Nice job on positioning the two burl knots. They work well with the overall shape.

Cheers,
Jeff.

(Oh, and thanks for your help. It's much appreciated.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Some of the pores in the grain were too deep and after 16 coats were still not filling in. I resorted to spraying some lacquer into the cap and dabbing it on the deeper pores with a small paintbrush.

This left what appeared to be air bubbles or perhaps "peaks" where the paintbrush pulled away. In any case, I let that lacquer stiffen for about 5 minutes and then sprayed a light coat over it which evened out the bubbles/peaks/whatever. (It's possible they would have evened out on their own, but I didn't chance it.)

Wet-sanding that down (with 400 grit) revealed that it was more successful than spraying 5 or 6 coats, but that it didn't completely do the trick. So I've just done a second paintbrush dabbing / light spray overcoat pass, and I'm hoping that'll do it.

Jeff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The "deep pore" issue is on the lower trim piece, which I guess takes more sun damage.

I've had a different problem on the upper piece: I've sanded through the finish 3 times now! It's always on an edge, and I've been able to move on by putting a bit of stain on a Q-tip and rubbing it over the sand-through spot, and then wiping it with a rag after about 1 minute. It does slow things down a bit, though, as the stain needs 8 hours before over-coating (as opposed to 30 minutes between lacquer coats).

Jeff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Finally got my rear window trim all sanded, rubbed and polished. Here's a couple of pictures.





They look a bit glossier to the naked eye than they do to the camera.

Jeff.
 
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