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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see the term “radiator re-coring” thrown around - is this type of service possible in US at a run of the mill radiator shop, or alternately is this something that should only be entrusted to UK luxury car specialists?

Or, do people just get another one from Flying Spares or such?

thx in advance for any advice

IR
 

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I'd take it to a radiator shop and see if they can. If it's a copper radiator, I don't see why they wouldn't
 

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And the real question is: Why do you believe you need to have your radiator re-cored?
 

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The shop measures the height, width and rows (width) of your old core. The new core arrives already soldered to a copper plate and this is trimmed to fit your top and bottom tank dimensions and soldered around the seams. It's old school work so make a few calls. Do not mention it is for a RR. My guy new right away when he saw the old one. It cost me approx $600 about 3 yrs ago.
There is nothing special about the set up. It is HEAVY, so consider having it done locally.
Will you remove the old one?
 

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And the real question is: Why do you believe you need to have your radiator re-cored?
He was using prestone long life coolant? Joking aside, before a core, a decent radiator shop can tank the old radiator and also rod it if need be which is much less expensive .
 

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@alabbasi

And also all joking aside, and having once been in the position where I knew a lot less than I know now, I've seen conclusion jumping like nobody's business about repairs that do not need to be made at all.

I'm just wondering whether there was a Step A, Step B, etc., or if someone went from Step A to, "needs to be re-cored."

The radiator in LRK37110 sat for years with no coolant change, and when I had "my unfortunate fan accident" and took it to the local radiator shop for repair their statement when I picked it up was, "That radiator looks like it's new inside."

But you're absolutely correct that if you have a radiator shop you can trust they'll be telling you what does, or does not, need to be done.
 

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I went from Step A to "needs to be re-cored". Years ago, my new-to-me Corniche was running hot, by gauge and laser thermometer, and the core displayed very irregular temperatures along the matrix. A re-core at Flying Spares was cheaper than my local shop (including shipping), together with a faster turnaround time.
For educational purposes, and to make the outgoing shipment package lighter and more practical for me to pack up, I cut off the matrix at the top & bottom ends. What I saw was eyes-opening.
I wish I could find those pics on my HDD and post them here. And I regret not keeping a section of the core in my horror cabinet of motoring. All this to say that Step B would have been a waste of time and effort.
With that new rad, I bought myself some peace of mind for the next 20 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
FWIW, I was asking about re-coring because the mechanic would performed our pre-purchase inspection identified the radiator as a weak spot on this particular car due to visual evidence of previous leakage etc and suggested we keep an eye on it with the possibility that it may give problems and may need to be re-cored. Thx for all the input!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So, no sooner did I post that the radiator isn’t currently leaking than it fulfilled everybody’s expectations of it and started leaking. So now I am definitely either in market for a recore of my radiator or a purchase of a new or overhauled radiator. If anyone has recommendations for a shop in the US mid-Atlantic area please let me know, I’ll also investigate the Flying Spares option.

Also, would be interested to know from someone who has done it, does the hood have to be removed to safely extract the radiator?

IR
 

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The bonnet is aluminum and light so 2 people can easily handle it. There are 4 1/2" bolts that hold the bonnet to the hindge. Mark the hinge on the bonnet to re-locate it in it's original location. The bonnet lamp cable has to be disconnected. The radiator is bolted to the front radiator support. Replace the top & bottom hoses.
Take picsof the previous leaake. You may not need a radiator.
 

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Oh yeah....dig in. Unless it's originating from the top expansion tank....BTW..This is a very straightforward procedure.
Once you remove the top hose and drain some coolant, get a flashlight and you will likely see whitish deposits on the tube openings.
Next: Finding an old time shop that can sweat in a new core properly. NOTE: Due not tell them it is from a RR. Nothing special about this radiator. You may have a soldered on tag on the top tank, save it. Some have them. It is the original radiator company tag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thx for the reply!

Maintenance receipts appear to indicate that the radiator was already recored about 15 years ago, but apparently not successfully.

For this reason, we are at least contemplating maybe getting another overhauled radiator.

IR
 

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The tanks are generally long lasting, but due to the nature of the narrow core tubes, junk hangs up and that's when the fun begins. 15 yrs is not bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
FWIW, I’ve been checking around with local auto shops and it looks like the trusted local radiator repair shop is somewhat of a vanishing breed, at least in the DC metro area. Apparently, new car radiators are made of plastic and aluminum and just get replaced. There is one in PG County Maryland that at one time was supposed to be “the guy” to go to, will investigate and post results here...
 

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looks like the trusted local radiator repair shop is somewhat of a vanishing breed
Not a huge surprise. Ours here in Staunton closed several years ago when the gentleman who operated it since before I was born, along with his son, decided to retire and the son did not want to take over the business. There are still what have now become "specialty shops" (but didn't used to be) that do this work, but they may not be local.
 
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