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Has anyone successfully replaced the rubber boots on the rear parking brake cables without replacing the whole cable? I’m wondering if I were to find the correct size boot if I could get it to stretch over the cable end without tearing.
 

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Jim, while you're in the vicinity, the parking brake mechanism has many moving parts and sits low and therefore dirt and corrosion are regular issues. Waterproof grease comes in handy here and spraying lubricant internally in the parking cable is worthwhile.
 

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In addition, like any electromechanical system, once you have everything working you need to exercise it to keep it that way.

Set and release your parking brake every once in a while. Run all your windows up and down, too.

Most things in these cars that end up being problematic get that way from lack of use.
 
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Re: Set and release your parking brake every once in a while.

Spoken as a true American.
 

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As I'm an American, that's accurate. But since I've only ever used a parking brake when parking on inclines (in addition to orienting the front wheels such that were the car to roll, it will almost immediately encounter the curb rather than go into the street and keep rolling) and don't frequently park on inclines my parking brake, in any car, seldom gets any use.

Now, mind you, all of the above is predicated on driving a car with an automatic transmission. I set the parking brake 100% of the time if dealing with a manual transmission.

It's actually interesting to see how the drive wheels work if you have your RR/Bentley up on a lift. Most think that they're immobilized (and I sure did), but they're not. Each rotates in the direction opposite to the other through some "miracle of gearing" that I don't clearly understand with each blocking the other from trying to turn in the direction it wants to turn, so even if you're on an angle somewhere the increased urge to roll by one rear wheel in one direction acts directly against itself via the other wheel. They fight against each other, immobilizing the car.
 

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Hi Brian

I meant the comment light heartedly. In the UK it was always drummed into us to always use the parking brake, so it seemed strange to me when I came to the US that no-one used it. The reason is of course that most UK cars were/are stickshift and in the US automatics transmissions are in the majority. I now do it the American way - only use the parking brake on inclines.
 
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