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Discussion Starter #1
Hello friends.

Engine Oil just appeared in my coolant. Not a huge amount, but it is there.

Of course head gaskets is my initial thought. Something else I shall check before trying gasket change ?

Gonzalo
 

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If the radiator top hose becomes rock hard when the engine has been running for a few minutes that's a sign that exhaust gases are getting into your coolant through a break in the head gasket and this causes a build-up of excess pressure in the cooling system.
 

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Do you see anything weeping from the block weep holes? There are upper and lower ones the first will indicate a lower liner seal failure with oil seepage from the sump, and the next one will usually indicate coolant.
There are other areas that may cause this issue.
Failure on the top end of the block usually ends up in the exhaust , ie, coolant from bad headgaskets or oil from valve stem or worn piston rings, etc.
 

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Thank you both, @shadow 11 and @Wraithman .

It should be the lower liner seals, the radiator hose is Ok.

That means I'll have to do a "tropical" seal replacement (i.e. down here in Mexico). lucky enough, I can do this at home, I know many will envy me, since I have a superb mechanic that I pay US$800 monthly, we have 15 years experience working together, and he is good at this tasks.

It is, however, an adventure, I have never pulled out an engine at home (Other than my 58 VW). So I see this as a nice challenge.

It seems I will be needing a lot of advice so I am thankful that so many experienced persons are willing to help me with my silly questions.

Gonzalo
 

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Hi
It's an interesting job. I did my SS2 a year ago December 2019.
A lot of nuts and bolts and a bit fiddly getting the gearbox out with torque converter attached. Beware it can fall off if not tied on.
Worst bit is unbolting the torque converter from the starter ring Best access i found was just behind the accumulator spheres location. (spheres removed)
The engine was reasonably easy, rad out, steering pump out, alternator out starter motor out, carbs off, exhaust manifolds left on, aircon pump suspended to one side but still connected
Lift the engine vertically. You have to jack the back, support it on the subframe with a bit of old carpet and a block of wood and remove the adaptor plate together with the rear engine mounts.
The engine is then supported on rear sub frame and front mount. it can't fall sideways as it is supported by the manifolds.
Taking apart is not too bad except for pulling the liners. We bent the liner puller and broke the bottom 3/4" from one liner.
Two nuts on the front of the crankshaft 1st oil pump drive needs to come off (special spanner) 2nd camshaft drive can stay if you are not having a regrind. Shaft still comes out. Another special
spanner but even with that I still could not move it.
So new liners, liner seals, piston rings, valve stem seals, relap valves plus all the usual bits it is now back and running nicely.
It was a nice little winter project took about 2 months (I,m an old man)
Good luck
Regards Martin .
 

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Thank you both, @shadow 11 and @Wraithman .

It should be the lower liner seals, the radiator hose is Ok.

That means I'll have to do a "tropical" seal replacement (i.e. down here in Mexico). lucky enough, I can do this at home, I know many will envy me, since I have a superb mechanic that I pay US$800 monthly, we have 15 years experience working together, and he is good at this tasks.

It is, however, an adventure, I have never pulled out an engine at home (Other than my 58 VW). So I see this as a nice challenge.

It seems I will be needing a lot of advice so I am thankful that so many experienced persons are willing to help me with my silly questions.

Gonzalo
The workshop manual is fairly good at explaining the procedure but be aware that the block needs to be heated in an oven to 320 degrees before refitting the liners. It's a major undertaking so rule out every other possible cause of oil contamination in your coolant before proceeding.
 

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There's a good article on tee-one topics. Bill Coburn used a heater and fire blanket and managed 80C (176F) and managed to pull the liners without cracking the block. I've read accounts of pulling them cold, but a cracked block is always a risk.

 

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It's very unlikely that the oil in coolant is coming from the liner seals. There is no oil pressure on the lower liner seal but there is up to 15 psi coolant pressure on the upper liner seal. The space between the lower and upper liner seals is open to the atmosphere via the weep holes. Any coolant getting past the upper liner seals will show up leaking from the weep holes. The first thing I would do is re torque the heads and see if that stops the oil getting into the coolant. Head gaskets and studs lose their clamping force over time and oil can be getting past the head gasket where the oil pressure feed for the rocker shafts transfers through it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you @Jim Walters . a wise advice that may save a lot of effort and money. Will try to re torque first of all.

Gonzalo
 
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