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In process of purchasing an early-1970s RR Silver Shadow 1.

Car has been subjected to thorough pre-purchase inspection and at the moment it starts, stops, runs, will cruise at 100 mph and appears to be basis for good driving automobile.

Prospective owner is a pilot and aircraft owner generally familiar with refurbishing complex multi-engine 1960s aircraft - but lacking any RR specific knowledge.

Once vehicle is in my possession I plan to have a more detailed inspection/test performed to triage things that need to be done immediately vs. things that can be done over time.

Are there any articled or tips documents that provide “What To Do Once You Take Title of a Silver Shadow” or such?

Am especially looking for particular old parts most likely to leave you stranded, items that people prophylactically replace as part of best practices, etc.

Thx!

IR
 

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Even though you may have a PPI done, was it performed by someone that is familiar with RR issues such as hydraulics and how to test the system before you purchase?
An overhaul of the hydraulics/brakes is a major expense and finding a knowledgeable tech or shop that really knows the system is few and far between.
For example: Run the engine at least 5 min and shut it off. Turn the key to on (no start) and depress the brake pedal with even strokes and count how many pulses it takes to illuminate the 2 warning lamps on the dash.
If any of the 2 lamps come on with less that 25 strokes, you are facing a hydraulic overhaul.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Even though you may have a PPI done, was it performed by someone that is familiar with RR issues such as hydraulics and how to test the system before you purchase?
An overhaul of the hydraulics/brakes is a major expense and finding a knowledgeable tech or shop that really knows the system is few and far between.
For example: Run the engine at least 5 min and shut it off. Turn the key to on (no start) and depress the brake pedal with even strokes and count how many pulses it takes to illuminate the 2 warning lamps on the dash.
If any of the 2 lamps come on with less that 25 strokes, you are facing a hydraulic overhaul.
Thanks very much for your prompt reply!

The gentleman who performed my PPI was in touch with an expert in LA who apparently is frequently consulted on these hydraulics issues. The conclusion was that the system is working correctly but has some weeping that should be dealt with.

Of course, by definition a PPI is far short of a thorough inspection. Our PPI took parts of 4 days and necessitated some basic remedial actions (eg new battery, new plug wires, correct spark plugs) to get the car running properly.

Any other immediate hints/tips gratefully accepted!

IR
 

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Correct brake/hydraulic fluid is Castrol RR363 DOT3. Some folk use a homemade mixture of DOT 3 or DOT 4 with 10% pharmaceutical grade castor oil and I've heard of no adverse effects but try it at your own risk. The brake fluid should be flushed and changed every 2 years. Also there are quite a number of hydraulic flexible hoses that should be replaced at max 8 year intervals. The hoses may look OK on exterior inspection but they deteriorate from the inside and the particles clog the various valves etc., which have very fine tolerances. The braking system is not like a conventional car, there are 2 cam driven brake pumps and the brake pedal is merely a switch that opens a brake distribution valve. There's a good article on this site or on the Australian RR Forum called "Silver Shadow flush and bleed the easy way" a Google search should unearth it. Also, the workshop manual for your car is available for free in the technical section of the Australian RR Forum. You can also search the Bentley Heritage site where all parts and schematics can be found for your particular car by entering your VIN/ chassis no. Another important thing to know about is the location of the safe jacking points as these cars weigh well over 2 tonnes and placing a jack in the wrong place can lead to vehicle damage or personal injury. Happy motoring.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Shadow 11 thanks very much for the insights.

I will keep them in mind as we sort through what has been done, and what needs to be done!

best

IR
 

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You're guaranteed to get experienced help here, just ask if you're stuck on anything. The braking system might appear daunting until you become familiar with it, then it becomes straight forward to diagnose.
 

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On a cautionary note "a slight weep" in the braking/suspension hydraulic system can develop into a deluge as the high pressure areas of the system operate at approx. 2500 PSI.
 

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In process of purchasing an early-1970s RR Silver Shadow 1.

Car has been subjected to thorough pre-purchase inspection and at the moment it starts, stops, runs, will cruise at 100 mph and appears to be basis for good driving automobile.

Prospective owner is a pilot and aircraft owner generally familiar with refurbishing complex multi-engine 1960s aircraft - but lacking any RR specific knowledge.

Once vehicle is in my possession I plan to have a more detailed inspection/test performed to triage things that need to be done immediately vs. things that can be done over time.

Are there any articled or tips documents that provide “What To Do Once You Take Title of a Silver Shadow” or such?

Am especially looking for particular old parts most likely to leave you stranded, items that people prophylactically replace as part of best practices, etc.

Thx!

IR
It will depend on how long the car has been in or out of service. Others are right to caution you on break pressures but don't overlook break pads that don't return to a full rest position. This will overheat the discs stc. Also check the battery connections a d the ground often. This will prevent a multitude of erratic issues. Carbs are pretty easily rebuilt if needed and parts are available. Old tires will have flat spots and cause a rumbley ride, and be unsafe. Climate control and window lifts will always need some work. The Silver Spirit is a gem of a car and will provide a great motoring experience. It will never be finished.
 
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