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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1997 Brooklands.

Has anyone ever have all the green strip hoses and brake calipers rebuilt ? Tying to estimate the price to replace all the rubber hoses in the system, rebuild the calipers, clean the tanks and clean the filters.
Someone said $8 to $11K for the job?

Thanks in advance!

Kevin
 

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I've replaced the flexi hoses on my Silver Shadow twice within the past 10 years. Also I clean the reservoir and flush and bleed the system every couple of years. Your car uses LHM brake fluid which is less hygroscopic so doesn't need to be changed as often. I've cleaned the callipers and replaced their seals and pistons once during the same period. The total cost of parts was a few hundred € and labour is free as I do it myself. The quotation you got is accurate for replacing all the flexi hoses, servicing or replacing all the various valve components including spheres, hydraulic pumps, brake callipers, height control system, brake distribution valves, flushing, bleeding etc., and many hours of labour at RR specialist prices. The bill for simply replacing the flexi hoses, cleaning & resealing the brake callipers, cleaning the reservoirs, flushing and bleeding the system shouldn't come to more than approx $2.5 thousand for parts and labour by an RR specialist in my guesstimation but maybe someone who actually does this work for a living could provide a more accurate estimate. The problem is that if your callipers are bad, your hoses are decaying and your reservoir is clogged with crud the chances are that the various other components in the system may need to be serviced too and that's when the bill starts to rise. Preventative maintenance by following the service schedule usually saves on cost in the longer term.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've replaced the flexi hoses on my Silver Shadow twice within the past 10 years. Also I clean the reservoir and flush and bleed the system every couple of years. Your car uses LHM brake fluid which is less hygroscopic so doesn't need to be changed as often. I've cleaned the callipers and replaced their seals and pistons once during the same period. The total cost of parts was a few hundred € and labour is free as I do it myself. The quotation you got is accurate for replacing all the flexi hoses, servicing or replacing all the various valve components including spheres, hydraulic pumps, brake callipers, height control system, brake distribution valves, flushing, bleeding etc., and many hours of labour at RR specialist prices. The bill for simply replacing the flexi hoses, cleaning & resealing the brake callipers, cleaning the reservoirs, flushing and bleeding the system shouldn't come to more than approx $2.5 thousand for parts and labour by an RR specialist in my guesstimation but maybe someone who actually does this work for a living could provide a more accurate estimate. The problem is that if your callipers are bad, your hoses are decaying and your reservoir is clogged with crud the chances are that the various other components in the system may need to be serviced too and that's when the bill starts to rise. Preventative maintenance by following the service schedule usually saves on cost in the longer term.
Thank you for taking your time to let me know. I can see why theses cars are selling for less with lack of maintenance.
 

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As an aside, mineral oil hoses are far more difficult to obtain if you limit your search to auto parts stores. Mineral oil systems were just not common for cars.

That being said, they are incredibly common on all sorts of farm equipment and heavy machinery, and there are services in virtually any area you can name that will make up hoses to spec. Now, mind you, you absolutely must check that what they can make would be street legal, and that means meeting the SAE spec that's most likely imprinted somewhere along the length of the hoses you've currently got. If you do have a local "hydraulics house" that can make street legal hoses, these will be much, much less expensive than Crewe Original.

I was just driving around Augusta County, VA, the other day and saw someone who did hydraulic hose work who was as close to "out in the middle of nowhere" as you can get. Your local farmers (if such exist) or heavy equipment rental places should know who does this work in your area.
 

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Jim,

One interesting development is that British Parts Northwest is now offering sets of PTFE-carrier tube, stainless braided brake hoses. Those will work with either DOT3 or mineral oil since PTFE is chemically inert and that design is superior to "regular" hoses.

At the time I last changed out all the hoses on SRH33576 these hoses were not available other than custom made, and I had two of them custom made for the ACV to body hoses. Now full sets are available at less than the cost of having a single one of those made.

I'm trying to figure out if "a full replacement set" can be put together for an SY car (I don't have a chart for the full set of SZ brake/hydraulic hoses) from several sets meant for MG/Jag/etc. I know that if I ever do this job again the only hoses I will use are the newer and stronger PTFE-carrier/stainless-sleeved hoses, which also have what is essentially a perpetual service life due to their construction.

I only learned of these today when rechecking my own SY chart after reading this topic. One example of a 4-hose kit:
British Parts Northwest Brake Hose Set HD Braided Stainless GT6 MKI by Goodridge
The thing would be knowing that your lengths are correct as well as the fittings being correct, and I don't know how these hoses cross to the GHP3, GHP26, and GHP96 hoses I used the last time around.

There have got to be crosses from the mineral oil hose numbers to these.
 
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