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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I keep finding small rust bubbles around The Lady Grey. Curious if this is common in warmer climates (originally a Texas car, then Florida) or if I'm getting unlucky here. I do think it's funny that most of what I've spent on this car so far has been on paint related stuff. In terms of mechanicals she's been a fairly solid runner. First the ceramic then the issue with the hard water burning into the ceramic is more than I've spent on sorting mechanically.

What should I be looking for in a body shop to correct this? I'm assuming I don't want to go to normal accident fixer-upper type shop. I was thinking of calling Bentley but I'm worried they will steer me to the absolutely most expensive option whereas I'm looking for a suitable option that will charge me only an arm rather than an arm and a leg.

And then I suppose the other question is, if I've managed to miss these two over the course of a few months what else am I missing?

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This looks like nothing more than typical "surface oxidation of aging" that any good body shop can take care of.

You're dealing with a car that's been around for a very long time (in car terms) and a bit of this on any car that's actually been driven like most are (that is, it's seen rain, etc.) will get these bits.

There's nothing magical about a Bentley or Rolls-Royce and body or paint work. Any skilled (key word) shop can handle them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, agreed on the sunroof. Appears to be more than just surface rust.

This is where the Jeep way of maintaining vehicles is nice. I took off a plastic panel to find my totally rust free vehicle had some developing near the tailpipe (presumably from years of heat). Sawzall baby! I bought some armor to cover up my work but in the end decided the extra 30 minutes of effort wasn't worth my time, leave it as is. No rust, no problem. Don't gotta look pretty. This situation with the Bentley, however, does not feel like a Sawzall occasion.
 

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Rust is not uncommon on Bentleys. Attached some pictures of my Arnage's undercarriage.

The trunk had rust bubbles close to the lock as well (not pictured).

Just as @alabbasi mentioned: salt is a key ingredient. My car was driven a lot in winter on salty roads by the previous owner. (how do I know this: he did not reset the nav-system with all his destinations in St. Moritz etc.... )

I got rid of it by soda blasting and application of ample amounts of Owatrol.

Another key driver is the fact that the paint process for low volume production cars is very manual an thus prone to variations in quality. If you take a close look at 10-15 year old Ferraris for example you will find similar spots like the one you've circled red.

A Mercedes S-Class won't have this problem as the paint process is very standardized and automated. (Notable exception: W220 pre-facelift where they screwed up the rust protection process by having bean counters reduce the amount of zinc applied. Back in the day ever owner could get a free new paint job done, which didn't help a lot though.)

I would simply apply Owatrol on the sunroof and leave the other bubbles untouched.


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