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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
Watched this video, and the gent says to replace suspension parts early to avoid a big bill later, at 3:15.
How do you test/know if your car needs suspension work?
Thank you!
 

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IMHO Exactly the same like in other cars, except, the additionall effect of diagonally swinging (it say, that rear struts need to be replaced/renewed).
 

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I saw that video too - I thought some really good advice in there - like using the car regularly, every £ spent on fuel is £2 saved on bills.

One of the obvious traits of worn out suspension is incorrect ride height on front end - the springs gradually compress and get shorter and need to be shimmed to the correct height. If it's wrong, spoils ride, handling and general driving pleasure. Many SZ cars have wrong ride height, even if the service history is very full. But it does specify ride height checking as part of the service schedule, but it just gets missed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I saw that video too - I thought some really good advice in there - like using the car regularly, every £ spent on fuel is £2 saved on bills.

One of the obvious traits of worn out suspension is incorrect ride height on front end - the springs gradually compress and get shorter and need to be shimmed to the correct height. If it's wrong, spoils ride, handling and general driving pleasure. Many SZ cars have wrong ride height, even if the service history is very full. But it does specify ride height checking as part of the service schedule, but it just gets missed.
Thaank you Single Malt!
For my 89 Silver Spur, should I try and find the recommended factory height settings? And if off, investigate underneath the old girls skirt?
 

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Thaank you Single Malt!
For my 89 Silver Spur, should I try and find the recommended factory height settings? And if off, investigate underneath the old girls skirt?
There is a factory method for checking the ride height - no special tools, but it's described in the workshop manual. If I remember rightly, they say have half a tank of fuel, get the car on completely level floor and then you take some measurements at various points. I have come across specialist independent mechanics who say you don't need to do it this accurately, and in fairness, they are probably experienced enough to set the height visually. Saying that, there will be others who will want to do it by the book. But taking the measurements will tell you if it's right or wrong.

There is a CD that Flying Spares sell with all the factory workshop manuals on it - email them so you get the right one for your car. It also has all the service schedules, and in those (if I remember) it says ride height should be checked on a number of the services. I do have the workshop manual, but it's on an old PC which I havent used for ages. But if I manage to, I'll confirm.

After that, I would recommend checking ball joints because these wear out quickly.

The problem is these cars are not very conventional in design, so even experienced mechanics struggle if they are unfamiliar. Rolls in those days was engineering led business and it was full of engineers designing the cars in their own way and not following convention. If they used something from another car (eg. Citroen) they modified it or just used elements of it.
 
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