Rolls-Royce and Bentley Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi

Am looking for guidance on the steps for swapping out the fuel accumulator on a 1988 Silver Spur. Is there any depressurization that's needed, and if so, how do I go about doing that? Anything else I need to know that might not be obvious - I'm assuming (and this might be a big incorrect assumption), that once depressurized I simply unscrew the old one, replace it with the new one and new washers and away we go.

Any tips would be appreciated.

Thanks all
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Once you get it jacked up and on jack stands. You can can then slide underneath and you’ll see it next to the fuel pump. Not difficult to replace. Just have limited gas in it or prepare the line shut to keep it from having gas run out of it. I changed both the pump and accumulator when I did mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Since you are likely to spill some fuel, have a fire extinguisher handy, and either wear a long sleeve shirt with the cuffs buttoned, or tie a shop towel around your wrists, The first time I changed one, some fuel ran down my arm to my arm pit. I had a bit of a chemical burn that was uncomfortable for about a week. This is not a very difficult job, it is just awkward and tight working space..

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I believe the service manual says to de-pressurize the system before doing any fuel system work by undoing the union at the fuel filter - which is under the drivers side front fender / sill (drivers side as in left hand drive for US). Some fuel will escape so have a rag or container handy as you undo the union.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Here are some pics of the accumulator on my 1989 Turbo R - I've been crawling underneath the car all day today trying to figure out how to replace all my hard lines as they are rusted out. The accumulator has a jubilee clamp connection at the rear (from the fuel return line) and then branches into the fuel pump output....
IMG_6956.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks folks. All good info. Will get some clamps to tie it off when I try it. Got a few extra questions -

1. Any idea how much fuel is likely to come peeing out when I depressurize? Are we talking ozs/cups or some nightmare scenario where we're talking liters and liters until the tank is empty (I currently have a full tank)? Is it a simple case (per the workshop manual) of undoing the nuts and letting some out until the pressure drops, or is there anything more scientific to it?

2. Anyone know the diameter of the line going in and out?

3. Where should I be releasing the pressure - at the line coming directly out of the accumulator, or next to the fuel pressure dampener (which goes to the fuel pump as well)?

3. Are there good after market alternatives for the accumulator that anyone knows of out there?

Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
1. Any idea how much fuel is likely to come peeing out when I depressurize? Are we talking ozs/cups or some nightmare scenario where we're talking liters and liters until the tank is empty (I currently have a full tank)? Is it a simple case (per the workshop manual) of undoing the nuts and letting some out until the pressure drops, or is there anything more scientific to it?
I found that it's usually just enough to run up to your armpit and make you yell profanities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
If the hose going from the tank to the pump becomes defective (broke) you will have more than a liter bit of fuel draining. On my 81 the connecting hose was brittle, on my 89 it didn't have a clamp on it, I was lucky, probably put 40,000 mile with it loose.
You do have the possibility of draining the tank, so either siphon most of the fuel out, then have a bucket ready to catch the rest. Be prepared for Murphy, He doesn't seem to bother me when I pay him his due before I start a task, only when I ignore him.
Good luck.
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
If the hose going from the tank to the pump becomes defective (broke) you will have more than a liter bit of fuel draining. On my 81 the connecting hose was brittle, on my 89 it didn't have a clamp on it, I was lucky, probably put 40,000 mile with it loose.
You do have the possibility of draining the tank, so either siphon most of the fuel out, then have a bucket ready to catch the rest. Be prepared for Murphy, He doesn't seem to bother me when I pay him his due before I start a task, only when I ignore him.
Good luck.
Jim
Thanks Jim. Sound advice. I'm going to time this once the tank is almost empty and check the surrounding lines and components beforehand just in case there's something waiting for me I wasn't planning.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top