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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any books on the history and evolution of the Corniche? You know, differences between the series and all sorts of nerdy details. I'm becoming a bit obsessed with this model (though not as much the V series).
 

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Wolfgang - I share your fascination with this model. You have to admire a body style that was largely unchanged for almost 30 years and looked as contemporary at the end as at the beginning. They are an absolute thrill to drive. I'm partial to the SZ platform (particularly the 20,000 series) but the earlier cars have their distinctive charms too.
 

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Yes, 20,000 is '87 1/2 - '89 Corniche II. The seats and front armrest changed for the '89 but otherwise, the same. The later cars are great and have some attractive interior changes but, as with all the SZ cars, the mechanical (more accurately electronic) complexity really increases as the years advance. Maintenance can be challenging and expensive.
 

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It's a big generalization, but I'd say there's a step function in complexity (and maintenance challenges/costs) with the adaptive height control in the III and things become more and more dependent on ECU controls (now 25 years old) as the models progress through the very rare S in '95. That's not to say they're wonderful cars that do cool stuff, but there's a cost to that development.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So if I'm gonna own one, I need to 1) make sure there's a mechanic within reasonable distance who can service it, and 2) be prepared to drop several thousand more dollars on repairs, depending on how long I own it.
 

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I think those are fairly reasonable assumptions but doing work yourself to some extent is possible too. For example, on the SZ cars there's a fuel accumulator that maintains fuel pressure to the injector pump. It fails over time, always. The part is a couple of hundred dollars. It's under the car, easy to get to with a lift, not impossible without one. The process to depressurize and disconnect/replace is simple. Doing it yourself will save several hundred dollars depending on your mechanic's labor rate. Some diagnostic processes and tools can be challenging for an amateur. What you have to remember is that you might be spending $60,000 for an '88 Corniche but you're maintaining a $200,000 ('88 dollars) car. It is going to cost some. If you don't mind the inquiry, what part of the US are you in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
In NJ, just outside of Manhattan. There's a Rolls dealership about 25 minutes away, and a couple garages in the area look like they are familiar with high end autos. Though learning to do some of the less demanding work could be fun and interesting.
 

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In southern NJ is one of the top people for these cars in the country. John Palma (Palma Classic Cars) in Audubon, NJ may be a bit far for just an oil change, but he's there for anything significant.
I echo David, John is a true gentleman and the best in the area for these cars. He will be able to solve any problem you encounter. He also may know of some good Corniche cars for sale and can conduct a thorough pre-purchase-inspection.
 
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