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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,


One of the many issue areas on my Silver Spirit II (92) is the amount of condensation it gets in its headlights after use. Well, not always just after use actually.


When I bought it and pointed out to the dealer there was a LOT of mould in the headlamps, he said I would be able to take the glass out and give it a wipe around on the inside.


I've since found out this is not the case and I suppose there's a leaky seal. It's on both sides of the car. Shame really, it looks so unsightly, but I guess there is no simple solution? Presumably new headlights at an extortionate £price?


Regards
James.
 

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Call the dealer, make an official letter reminding you pointed this point.
Try to find a solution with him.
You need to be very persuasive and responsaibilise him.

Have you a dealer warranty ?
 

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Hi James,


If it is bad and damaged/degraded the reflective surface it is usually an MOT failure point.


At the very least it should have been recorded as an observation.


Trouble is with dealers they usually can get things through as MOT station likely gets a lot of business from them.


So yes likely new lights required.


All the best


Steve
 

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The glass lens is held on by clips which often break. The is a rubber rope that fits into a groove for a seal. The entire headlamp assembly must be removed.
 

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I would also have to imagine that these headlamp assemblies, much like the ones on my 1989 Deville, have drains/vents in the form of very slim tubes somewhere. These can become blocked and not allow moisture egress as well.


One of my headlamps on the Cadillac had a small chip in the lens with a pinhole allowing moisture in, which is also something to check carefully for, though from the photograph this does not seem to be the case with yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Unfortunately, I've already had a full and final settlement with him when I complained about a number of other things.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Steve, I think one day I will get new lights, because they do spoil the look. I dare not think how much they would cost!


Yes, I mentioned my issues with the dealer on his choice of MOT station. After a Rolls specialist did an assessment on the car, he said some of the advisories were a nonsense, ie not true. And things that should have been FAILURES, were not included.


But this raises an interesting question. Should you take a complicated car like an elderly Rolls, to any old MOT station? That in all likelihood, has never been near one ever before? Or is it best to go to your Rolls Royce specialist and get them to take it to an MOT station which they have used themselves? So there's an outside chance the MOT assessor does actually know the cars....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Wraithman for that weblink, very interesting. Something that seems so simple, but when you look into it, really actually isn't that simple...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's a good point Brian. Whilst I'm pretty sure there's no chip in either of the lens, I will just go double check. The car has not been loved for a good decade, so nothing surprises me now...
 

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Hi James,


MoT's or as known too as DoT's are not a good subject for me to discuss as I lost my girlfriend nearly 50 years ago after her Lotus Elan had been bodge repaired on the front chassis leg and put through what later I was to find out a known 'easy' test station by the seller.


That said the tests are essential and the majority centres respectful. Indeed I would rather go to one that is known to be tough but again the way it works in UK at times it generates work for the garage albeit you do have options to select your own repairer.


The French system of Controle Technique is better as the test centres do not perform repairs just totally a test facility.



There is no doubt though over the years much more control has been placed on our UK centres. That said I often see unnecessary advisories where I think the tester want's to show they have had a thorough look over the car.


Our GOV.UK site from 2005 now allows you to look at a cars past MOT history test details and it helps somewhat to see if work has been done to correct faults. Just put your registration number in for details https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-history you don't even have to own the car so worth doing if considering any car purchase. Cars over 40 years old though are exempt and it is up to the owner if they decide to have their cars checked which I sincerely hope they do as for the time it takes and the cost it really is a reasonable hourly rate for a mechanics time.



When you put up some previous posts a few months back one was you had a 'shrill' what was the outcome.....it is always nice to close down an issue and let us know.


Also during that exchange we asked what your car was going into the garage for and you said 'ball joints' so was this another item that the car was sold to you with or had you been made aware. Just asking.


Regards your front lights you may be able to pick up some from a breakers yard much cheaper and as long as no signs of reflector imperfections especially where it joins the glass that is a least a good sign.


Keep us updated as you go and keep yourself safe


Steve
 

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While I have an article from The Modern Lady about doing a US-Quad headlamps to Euro-style headlamp conversion, none of the pictures included show what the entire Euro headlamp assembly looks like from front and back.


There's generally nothing overly complicated about these, they're a lens, seal, and reflector plus any drains/vents that may be attached.


If someone happens to have photos of the Euro headlamp assembly from multiple angles off the car that would be helpful to share.
 

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Hi Brian,


I just googled it and found loads of pictures from various angles


https://www.ebay.com/itm/Rolls-Royce-Silver-Spirit-Silver-Spur-1985-95-Euro-Headlamp-RH-Right-UT13792-OEM/264298586192?hash=item3d896c6050:g:0MAAAOSw-81Zm0Sq


Even shows the clips wraithman refers to so you can remove the front glass.


Problem is when I looked at James' pictures it looked like the reflector itself was tarnish spotted. I have had metal ones re coated with the reflective surface but never plastic ones



All the best


Steve
 

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As a temporary fix to improve looks you might be able to remove the bulbs, insert a piece of rag into the reflector and move it around with a screwdriver or plastic tube. Then have fun getting the rag back out. I've done it before though not on RR.

Also, warming the glass with a hair drier will usually shift it, but it will return.
 

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Also, warming the glass with a hair drier will usually shift it, but it will return.

Just taking out the lamps and sitting the car pointed into the sun will usually get this amount of condensation to disappear very quickly, at least if there's any air movement and it's not humid. The warming with a hair dryer is a great idea, too.


It will definitely return unless you figure out the path of ingress for that moisture, which would most likely be due to seal compromise. I have used this product, Captain Tolley's (formerly Captain Tolley's Creeping Crack Cure - and why they've dropped all hint of what it does from the name, I'll never know), with great success when dealing with hairline/very tiny cracks in seals. It was a lifesaver for a windshield seal leak where I could never even come close to finding the path of ingress of water and did not wish to remove.


If the issue is the seal between the glass lens and plastic body this stuff would probably work with ease and the results do last.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks all.


Some very useful tips. I will have a go at trying to get some of the mould stains out by going through the bulb hole, though not sure I'll get much inside glass coverage. And might just have a try with that Captain Tolley's Creeping Crack Cure too, once I get the lens dry.



Thankfully no condensation in the turn signals.
 

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Hi James,


Captains Tolley may end up Captains Folley in the UK I have never seen it by that name. However we have something equivalent by Comma called 'seek n seal'.


I only get condensation in my reverse lights thankfully front main lights are sealed beams.


I ended up on the reverse lights making a small gap at the base of the gasket as the moisture would just build up and cause a pond inside.


You may find your rubbers at the rear perished but it is a big problem on a lot of cars in UK.


Inside the house and the loft I have a complete dehumidifier system even though double glazed too at times on the pool windows I still get condensation this time of year.


All the best


Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Ahh, thanks Steve. I had wondered if a couple of little holes at the bottom of the headlamps would help? Given they are clearly no longer air tight...?
 
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