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I've appreciated the advice the on the 'Buying Advice for First Time Buyer" thread and hope there's some more coming. I'm starting to develop a 'position' on the matter based on your insights and my reading on the web, but haven't reached conclusion yet.

However, I'm wondering what you do for parts. Whether you DIY or take it to the specialist do you always get your parts from the local shop or do you source online? I know when I was doing work on my BMW that it almost always made sense to buy online rather than from the local guy. Especially since I am so far from a large city.
 

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Well, I would have to say if you have the resources and storage space, buy a salvage car for your hard parts, body, interior and trim, etc: As for expendable parts, filters, relays etc, you had better begin to think about long term stock shortages, the dealers are purging their shelves of these parts and replacing the space with newer model parts. The ones that sell more often and pay the most. We are looking at a long term problem in parts availability . There are some "cottage" industry parts makers popping up, but the critical items are getting rare and really expensive...
 

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Parts... this is a problem. Some parts are very expensive and let's face it when you go to a local shop they do not have the part and cannot source it either, so you have to go to the dealer. Depending on what part is needed, you can sometimes have them second hand. There is a very good source which is Flying Spares http://www.flyingspares.com/ I have dealt with them before leaving the UK. They did the repairs on the car and sourced the parts for a very affordable price. I would definitely recommend them
 

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I have bought parts from Flying Spares and Introcar. But by the time the shipping is added, I can get the parts locally about the same cost.
 

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Introcar is very much more expensive than Flying Spares though. Also when buying from or outside the EU, just make sure that the seller does not declare 'too much' on the custom form, or else another nice expense will be added to the cost! :(
 

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I have never had a problem with finding reasonably priced parts for my cars. However, it does take a lot of research, which is why these forums are so valuable. You need to research where to find what parts, for example I found that the local classic MG supplier can sell me almost all electrical and carburettor parts for my Rolls-Royce. The local RR dealer is good for basic service parts like filters etc, and more unique parts are best imported from the likes of Flying Spares in the UK. Whenever I import these parts I ask them to include a few service items as well, and then I keep it in stock for later use.

The local MG guys even had a new, original regulator for my 1948 Bentley, at a most reasonable cost. Buying the same item from RR would have cost me considerably more. Don’t assume for one moment that all RR parts are unique. That said, I also do not believe in modifying parts, like brake pads. You can drill some cheap brake pads to fit the Silver Shadow, but I’d rather spend the money on original parts.

Cheers
 

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Older, but good topic and I' am in boredom today! The modern cars, Shadow and Spirit/Spur/Dawn, along with the Bentley equals. Have decent parts supply. I have space, like my Porsche 928's, will pick up a parts Spur or two at some point. I buy on line when parts are needed, bonus with these era is most of the parts are in use with other makes. Same as most low production and more exotic vehicles. Only caveat is sometimes the part has been modified for the same application. Example: had a 944S needing a transmission rebuild. Audi used the same transmission and their rebuild kit was half price. The gearing on the Audi was slightly different, lost some top end performance. For older models, which I hope to have one or two in the future. CNC water jet technology is becoming reasonable for decent sized restoration shops and machine shops. With this equipment just about anything can be made in reasonable time and cost effective in low numbers. Jay Leno has one for his garage, he can make new engine blocks, to the smallest bits and even specialty tools. With the U.S being a huge market for collectible automobiles in general, with this technology the future is bright for even hard to impossible bits being available at reasonable cost.
 
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