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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So after accidentally buying a 1974 RR SS Landaulette last week, I got it delivered to my workshop in Arizona and was able to take a decent look at it. I put a battery on it and switched the ignition on, to find that both Hydraulic lights were on. I removed the reservoir lid and baffles, to see that the fluid was low but clear with no sediment. I refilled to the lowest marking with the engine not running and then went on to try and start the engine. It actually started right up but ran like it was on full choke for about 5 mins, even though the air temp was about 80 degrees F. both brake light went out and the brakes seem to operate as advertised, but when I went out to re-service the hydraulic fluid I noticed that the choke stove pip is broken where it's supposed to join the manifold and the small union is missing. I assume that's why the Choke is full on. The air pump belt is also missing, but I don't think that would effect the mixture. Am I on the right track? It's been years since I worked on one of these things!!
 

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Smog pumps are often disconnected via the belt and sometimes the "antlers" are removed and the holes plugged.
It's very important to determine the health of the accumulators with the "pedal test" If the pedal test fails, you must make the repairs to correct or your braking ability will be in serious jeopardy.
Search this forum for brake pedal test.

The 2 "stove pipes are common steel tubing and often rust away. They can be fabricated with ordinary steel line or copper. Careful with the braided covering since it is known to have asbestos.
 

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Yes Steve, the choke will take a very long time to come off if at all if one of the pipes is broken. You can make up new ones using 3/16ths brake pipe, with the appropriate flare on the end to match the flare on the union. They often rust away and break at the exhaust manifold connection too. In the mean time just use an elastic band or piece of wire to hold the choke arm up and off. If the pumps and brake spheres are good, you should have quickly emptied the reservoir if you only added DOT3 to the minimum levels. The level should go down quite a bit to fill the accumulator spheres if they are good. If they are depleted of nitrogen, and are full of brake fluid, you will not see the level of the fluid go down much. It sounds like that is the case if the fluid you added did not go down. As Rob says it is extremely important to do the pedal pump down test to determine the state of nitrogen charge in the spheres. Do not trust that you have more than one or two applications of the brake pedal just because the warning lamps are extinguished.
 

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Or fabricate a new stove pipe with cunifer (copper nickel) since it's pliable and easy to bend. If you give the accelerator pedal a blip the choke should release. It's advisable to use a light oil on the choke lever but keep the cam face dry. The starting procedure is to turn on the ignition, press the accelerator and release it. That sets the choke. Then start the engine without touching the accelerator pedal. Once it starts the revs should reduce as the choke releases when you blip the accelerator pedal. When you're replacing the choke stove pipe it might be a good idea to remove the cover for the choke spring and spray cleaner followed by light oil on the spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advise, I did the pedal test as described on another site and it passed with flying colors. as soon as i started the engine the fluid level went down dramatically and I added another 2 quarts, The problem with the stove pipe is finding the fitting that screws into the manifold as there are no specs on it and I'm not sure of the thread. I have just ordered one from the UK, but it will probably take weeks to get here, so I was going to try and disable the choke mechanism for the time being. I don' think that the car had been started since about 2014 and I was surprised that it fired right up. To be honest, I'm not a novice with these cars, I live in Arizona, but I actually come from Crewe in Cheshire UK. I served my apprenticeship there (at the factory) from 1977, but that is very different to working on a broken Rolls Royce LOL. I restore and modify British cars as a Hobby (and therapy), as I have been in the Aerospace industry for 35 years I have several E-Types, a 64 Mini Cooper S, a highly modified Triumph Stag, a Triumph TR250, a highly modified London Taxi and so on and so forth... You will be pleased to know that I'm not going to change the Rolls Royce at all, as with the Landaulette roof it's already pretty unusual.
 

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Be aware, unlike conventional brake hydraulic systems, the RR system circulates and is filtered with the micro mesh screens in the reservoir. When the car is started fluid will draw down a bit giving you the false sense it is low , only to rise again when shut off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’m not sure how to post a photo on here, but I modified my stage to 5.0 mustang cobra engine and a BMW rear axle years ago. You wouldn’t be able to tell from the outside,, but it certainly has a burble LOL.
 

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WOW, that thing must really move !
The 3 litre Stag engine was an engineering disaster, as I'm sure you know.

See screen shot, click on the picture icon and it will give you the option to upload.
Rectangle Automotive lighting Bag Font Automotive exterior
 

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There were some teething problems with the Stag's cooling system but these issues were soon addressed. Unfortunately, bad press put buyers off. I've experienced no mechanical or cooling problems during my 15 years ownership. I fitted a bespoke raised coolant header tank as an extra precaution.
 

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I will disagree with you, I drove my Tr7 as a daily driver for work for too may years, it saw a lot of use, 25 miles in and back.
The Stag had the same problems with the bad location of the water pump and it's horizontal location that was prone to cavitation _ that was never fixed.
Improvements were attempted, but that never solved the problem.
The other problems were the head bolts _ one bank longer then the other, they didn't expand and contract at an even rate causing the head(s) to warp, even when they didn't over-heat _ the head gaskets eventually failed because of the warpage problems.
The cam shaft could not turn in the warping heads and timing chains broke on an interference engine.
When pushed hard at over 80mph, the weak engine had catastrophic failures

Cars that are driven now are only driven for short runs to car shows and the grocery store, and theses problems don't really surface for many years or even decades.
Then drivers claim that these problems don't exist.
Start the video at around 8 minutes, you will have to put up with the guys silly puppet.

Why did the Stag FAIL so Spectacularly? - YouTube

Triumph's V8: The worst engine ever made | Driving
 
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