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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. Im in Los Angeles, and just picked up a 74 SIlver Shadow for a low price. I have a couple of Jags, but this is different. It currently wont start up, it has spark, and yet not able to confirm that there is petrol flow. Hopefully with the help from this forum I will be able to get it back on the road.
 

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How long has it been sitting ? When was the last time it was driven and how was it stored, eg. heated garage or outside ?
Obvious things to check are the float bowls full of fuel, do the pistons move freely in the carbs ?
Can you hear the fuel pump ticking away ?

Owning the Jaguars, you've probably checked the basics ???

Any service records ?

Usually cars like these that have been had for cheap have major issues, like the brakes.
 

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Hi,


and welcome


First can you confirm your chassis number.


If you have spark then as Jeff says likely fuel supply line is compromised.


Look and see if you have the original SU pumps fitted and yes with ignition ON you should here the pumps tick on this model year.


You have a fuel filter under the car and small filters actually at each carb fitted in line at the top of the float feed lines.


You need to loosen not necessarily disconnect the main line in the engine bay and just check fuel is getting to the carbs. If SU's you can try knocking them on the metal solenoid body as the internal points do tend to oxydise and stick. Often a light sharp tap can get them going.


Do you know how long the car has stood without actually running. I would never usually recommend even cranking a long standing car over even. I have two specially made pipes I fit to the brake pumps and feed back into the reservoir caps as well as a few other things before an initial crank.


The fact you say you have spark I must assume already you have cranked over the engine.


Look after the engine and transmission once you get it started with new coolant and oil changes and yes expect some heavy work on the way with brakes and hydraulics needing work.


All the best


Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi! Thanks for the welcoming. So yes I did crank the engine, but did change the oil first. The tank had no fuel in it, so I added 2 gallons via a gas can. I do have the original SU carbs in it. Im not familiar with how gasoline is fed to them so Ill look for a fuel line to confirm that there is fuel flowing. Very interesting carbs btw! The car belonged to an old friend whose health began to fail. He states that its been a couple of years but his wife says its been 3-5 years since last driven. It was stored in an underground parking structure. Where it was usually anywhere between 60-80 degrees.
 

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I'm guessing that you have twin SU fuel pumps which are located near the rear subframe, you should hear them ticking for a few seconds when you turn on the ignition until the carb float bowls are filled, then back pressure stops the pumps from working until the carb pressure drops as you use fuel after starting.

There's a main fuel filter under the middle of the car on the passenger side (LHD) and there are two more small filters where the fuel pipe enters the float bowls.

The procedure for starting the Silver Shadow is to turn on the ignition and listen for the fuel pumps to start clicking, when the clicking stops press the accelerator pedal to the floor and then release it, this sets the choke cam, then without you foot on the accelerator pedal turn the key to start and it should fire up if you have spark, fuel and air going to the cylinders. Once it fires up it should run at fairly high RPM but if you blip the accelerator pedal the choke flap should open and the RPM should lower, you will need to do this at intervals until the engine warms sufficiently to run without choke.

You can check for fuel delivery from the pump if you open the flexi hose connection where the fuel hose meets the steel fuel line in the engine bay, place the end of the flexi hose in a suitable container and turn on the ignition and fuel should pump unless the pumps are defective or the main fuel filter is choked with crud. If you have fuel getting that far then check the small filters at the carbs.

There's also the possibility that the carb float needles are stuck if the engine hasn't run for a long time. If you have HD8 carbs you might be able to free the float needles by tapping the float bowls with a screwdriver if you're lucky or by opening the pipe connection and squirting some carb cleaner into the float needle orifice, if you have HIF7 carbs you could try squirting carb cleaner into the small filter housings but it's more likely that you will have to remove both carbs as a unit and open the float bowls to clean or replace the float needles. Good luck.
 

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A vehicle stored for that period of time will need quite a bit of work especially with hydraulis. Factory guide lines are to flush the brake fluid every 2 years. I would recommend buying a turkey baster and removing the lid off the reservoir. Remove the screen just under the lid. Carefully peel it away. Next, use the baster to withdraw as much brake fluid as possible from the reservoir. You will see a plate on each side of the partition and they are secured to the center divider. Remove the plates. You will then see 3 round items, they are delicate filter screens and cost approx $70 each. They unscrew with a 1" deep socket. Unscrew them an see if there are any voids or cuts in the fine screens. They may be collapsed due to the 2 hydraulic pumps trying to suck fluid thru them. If you have sediment in the bottom of the tank, clean it out. The 2 posts have reed switches inside them...do not bend. There are 2 white/black plastic rings which are magnets that float on these posts. Note the orientation of them. The black side is on the bottom.

The integrity of the hydraulic/brake system is the Achilles heel of the Shadows and not maintaining and driving them will result in thousands of dollars worth of time and parts to make them roadworthy. Be prepared for the long haul. If you are not mechanically inclined and do not have the proper tools you may be behind the eight ball with this one.

I have fully restored many of these and currently doing a 1976 which sat for long periods.

Please ask for advice and become familiar with the TSD service manual for your motorcar.

http://rrtechnical.info/
 

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Hi,


It is difficult to be sure without an exact chassis number but I would assume your fuel pumps maybe under the car centre box section on the right hand side just where the jacking point is and the fuel filter underneath at the rear axle.


At some point the positions were changed around at the factory mid 70's and a service bulletin recommended this too for hot climates where cars were suffering fuel vapourisation problems.


The SU's are simple to remove and refurbish and all spares are available. That said the most common problem is just oxydised points inside.


All the best


Steve
 

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It is the chassis number. It is also stamped on the top of the subframe near the steering box, a boss on the engine block behind the water pump and also at the R/Front shock tower.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
A vehicle stored for that period of time will need quite a bit of work especially with hydraulis. Factory guide lines are to flush the brake fluid every 2 years. I would recommend buying a turkey baster and removing the lid off the reservoir. Remove the screen just under the lid. Carefully peel it away. Next, use the baster to withdraw as much brake fluid as possible from the reservoir. You will see a plate on each side of the partition and they are secured to the center divider. Remove the plates. You will then see 3 round items, they are delicate filter screens and cost approx $70 each. They unscrew with a 1" deep socket. Unscrew them an see if there are any voids or cuts in the fine screens. They may be collapsed due to the 2 hydraulic pumps trying to suck fluid thru them. If you have sediment in the bottom of the tank, clean it out. The 2 posts have reed switches inside them...do not bend. There are 2 white/black plastic rings which are magnets that float on these posts. Note the orientation of them. The black side is on the bottom.

The integrity of the hydraulic/brake system is the Achilles heel of the Shadows and not maintaining and driving them will result in thousands of dollars worth of time and parts to make them roadworthy. Be prepared for the long haul. If you are not mechanically inclined and do not have the proper tools you may be behind the eight ball with this one.

I have fully restored many of these and currently doing a 1976 which sat for long periods.

Please ask for advice and become familiar with the TSD service manual for your motorcar.

http://rrtechnical.info/
Thanks for the detailed tip! Much appreciated!
 

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Hi,


Interesting car and shows exactly why the chassis number is important whenever asking questions about the RR cars.


Your car is a 'tweeny' which means it was inbetween model years. It is actually listed as a 1975 Shadow 1 but has a 1974 chassis number so although built in 1974 probably has a lot of Shadow 11 changes incorporated as development progressed. Quite possibly it was also an early development 'homologation car' but you would need to get the build records from RROC in UK to find out its history.


I was not aware the Shadow 11 type bumpers were fitted earlier to the Shadow 1 but could have been especially just for North American market. Brian and Wraithman may know more on this as certainly not done for UK market.



Can you get some pictures of the underbonnet and see which carbs were fitted and also sometime look and see if you have the accumulators one on each side or just the two on the lower LHS of the engine bay.


All the best


Steve
 

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Here are some pics of the car being extracted from its concrete grave
If there was ever a desirable place to have a forgotten about SS, that underground parking lot is about as good as it gets.
No raccoons, wild life or insects, nice and dry, no moisture or sun.
 

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My recent addition of a 1976 Shadow LWB was stored in the garage of the famous Hotel Carlyle in NYC and thus the wood and leather are superb, but the hydraulics.....you know the rest.
 

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Your hydraulic fluid reservoir lid looks to be in better condition that most which is a positive sign. I think your carbs are SU HD8 which would have a float bowl approx. the size of a teacup beside each carb but it's difficult to be certain from the photos. If they have separate float bowls you should tap the side of the bowls to see if that will free the float needles.
 

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Here are some engine pics. Which part of the carbs should I tap btw?
The red arrow points to the top of the float bowl. The green arrow is the bolt that attaches the lid to the float bowl.
Gently tap that bolt with the handle of a screw driver.


You may have to move some things out of the way to get to it, be carful not pull anything off or disconnect anything when doing so.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thank you very much guys! So here is what I have so far. Before I start looking at other things. The pumps come on but never stop ticking, so Im thinking theyre not pressurizing. I should look at fuel filter and service that part first.
 

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If the pumps are ticking the chances are that they are OK electronically but may not be delivering fuel because filters are blocked. There's a small fuel filter in each fuel pump, a large fuel filter under the car a few feet after the pumps and a tiny filter where the fuel lines enter each carb float bowl (if opening the float bowl pipes be careful not to lose parts as the filters are spring loaded inside, place a cloth under the pipe fitting to catch any small parts that could accidentally fall out). I think I would start by removing the hose pipe to the large filter under the car and place the end into a can and see if the pumps are delivering fuel that far, if not you probably have clogged pumps. If fuel is getting to the large filter replace the hose and open the pipes at the float bowls one at a time and see if fuel is being delivered that far. If no fuel is getting to the carb float bowls your large filter is probably blocked but if fuel is reaching the end of the lines to the float bowls but the float bowls are not filling then either the small filters at the end of the lines are blocked or the float bowl needles are stuck. If you log into heritage.bentleymotors.com you can enter your chassis number SRC20575 the site will show you a diagram of the fuel lines and filters and all the relevant part numbers. Also if you go on to Australia RR Forums you can download the workshop manual for you car for free and the diagrams there show the location of the small filters at the carb float bowls along with the complete lay out of the fuel system. A car that has been lying up for so long is bound to have fuel problems, the tank may have crud in it, there's a bung at the bottom of the tank that you can open to drain any old fuel and if you can get a camera scope inside through than bung hole or by removing the fuel level sender unit at the top of the tank you will get a better idea of the state of the tank. There's no point in fitting new filters etc if the tank is contaminated with crud as you will be back to square one in no time.
 
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