Coolant(s) Change Method(s) 2012 EWB Ghost - Rolls-Royce and Bentley Forums
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post #1 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 12:30 PM Thread Starter
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Coolant(s) Change Method(s) 2012 EWB Ghost

I need some help from forum members doing some maintenance for my EWB 2012 Ghost. It is time for a coolant change in the radiator and the air intake circuit but I do not have technical information to accomplish this properly. Where are the drain sites and fill areas? Volumes needed?

Can I use a basic G5 coolant that can last for 4 or 5 years? When Do I change the spark plugs?

I have just changed the oil to 5W-20 Motorcraft semi synthetic oil. I found the air filters to be easy and best yet inexpensive (unlike the v12 Bentley Flying Spur Speed).

Thanks for your help.

aehaas
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post #2 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 02:41 PM
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Good luck in your quest to find information. You are one of the very few "really new RR" owners here or on any of the forums related to these cars that I frequent. You're blazing the DIY trail with this, and I do not know of any copies of the Integrated Electronic Technical Information System (IETIS) that is available for these cars, unless RR itself sells them.

If the Flying Spur Speed happens to use the same cabin pollen filters as the Arnage did there are Mann filters available that are a direct substitute.

Brian

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post #3 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 04:12 PM
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I have to ask, and not to be rude, but anyone who has the money for such a new RR, even a used one, normally would take their car to a certified garage for such menial tasks ?
With that said, I went to RockAuto just to see, and there is one listed, but no photo. It's a NISSENS 60779, never heard of that brand though.
Googling that shows no photo either, but a rad is rad, there has to be a spigot somewhere to drain it.
There should also be a drain on the block and for a W12 or V8, there usually is one on each side of the block.
I would think the real problem of working on such an engine are all the plastic shrouds covering everything up, it may take half a day just to get at the drain cocks.
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post #4 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 04:27 PM
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Also, this engine has individual ignition coils for each spark plug, so there are no spark plug wires to be found, just individual wiring harness plugs going into each coil.
I'm sure this all accessible underneath the top engine shroud. Here is a photo from RockAuto.


http://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo....503148&jsn=363
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post #5 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 05:14 PM
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It's also worth noting that for virtually any really new car I know of spark plugs never need to be changed barring some issue having occurred that fouled them (which is rare).

This has become a consistent enough assumption that many makers are doing things (and Bentley did) like requiring the engine to be dropped out of the car to change the plugs. Iridium and platinum plugs have a very long service life even in older cars with less than precise fuel control and almost perpetual service life in contemporary cars of the "all electronic control" era.

I just hope whatever ignition coils RR chose to use on the Ghost are a lot more reliable than the Denso ones that Jag used at least from the late 1990s through mid-2000s, if not longer.

Brian

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post #6 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 05:41 PM Thread Starter
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I like working with cars and I always treat them as I am going to keep them forever. I super maintain them along with anything else I own. I also know that if I do the "work" it is done right. Yes, you could say I over do it.

Other reasons to do it myself is that I am very choosey about the fluids I use. For example, the dealership would be using 5W-30 grade oil while I put in a 5W-20 grade into my car. As an example, I use a 0W-30 in another car that specs a 10W-60 grade lubricant.

Regarding spark plugs. The reason to change them is not because they wear at all. The problem is that the block is aluminum and the plugs are steel. Electrical corrosion can make them impossible to replace over time.

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post #7 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AEHaas View Post

Regarding spark plugs. The reason to change them is not because they wear at all. The problem is that the block is aluminum and the plugs are steel. Electrical corrosion can make them impossible to replace over time.
That can be eliminated by a single removal, judicious application of a copper-based anti-seize, and putting them right back in. I don't doubt that the issue you describe can occur, but it is rare.

With regard to coolant, does the Owner's Handbook give a specific brand or brands (or just stick to the RR 'part' number)? If the latter, what is specified? [Do they even put this information in today's Owner's Handbook? I really don't know.]

Brian

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post #8 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 07:12 PM
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One would think that RR would have put steel sleeves in the head rather then have the threads of the plug come in direct contact with the aluminum.
My 51 Bentley is like that _ and is the only case where I've seen that done, all the vehicles that I've had, that have had aluminum heads, did not use a threaded steel insert.
Nice garage BTW AEHass !
A little cluttered here and there, but looks clean.

Last edited by Jeff R 1; 12-10-2016 at 07:14 PM.
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post #9 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 07:32 PM
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One would think that RR would have put steel sleeves in the head rather then have the threads of the plug come in direct contact with the aluminum.
And given Crewe's love of quirky, boutique engineering where it least made sense, I'm surprised they didn't do this, too.

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My 51 Bentley is like that _ and is the only case where I've seen that done, all the vehicles that I've had, that have had aluminum heads, did not use a threaded steel insert.
As I said earlier, any issue with this is so incredibly rare, at least from my queries, as to make it not worth consideration. I know of no case where this has happened, but since it keeps being repeated as a possibility I have to believe there are the statistically insignificant number of cases out there. With the advent of anti-seize lubricants this whole issue pretty much disappears.

If it were something of real concern Crewe would have kept doing what they were doing. It's amazing how long certain things hung around after their respective times had truly passed and something better had long ago come along. Crewe loved the "tried and true," and didn't tend to go "revolutionary" until someone else had tried something enough that they decided it was true, then they'd adopt it.

Brian

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post #10 of 33 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 08:30 PM
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I forget though that it's a BMW engine...
Or is it ???
At any rate, I think German engineering is more practical then British.
Maybe stirring the pot there a bit.

And did they use copper-never seize on the plugs when the car was assembled ?
They must have lubricated the threads with something ???
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